Document Type : Original Articles

Authors

1 Rehabilitation Research Center, Department of Occupational Therapy. School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Tehran, Iran

2 Rehabilitation Research Center, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

3 Rehabilitation Research Center, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran University of Medical Science (IUMS);Tehran, Iran

10.30476/jrsr.2022.92680.1213

Abstract

Background: Pain in patients with stroke is one of the essential factors that can influence upper-limb performance, and it is better to divide these people into separate groups. The Ad-AHA (Adult-Assisting Hand Assessment) is a tool that recently is being used in upper-limb performance evaluation among patients with stroke.  The present study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the Ad-AHA among patients with chronic stroke who had pain to discriminate between the high upper-limb performance group and the low upper-limb performance group. 
Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 51 patients (The mean age±SD was 69.33±8.73) with chronic stroke who had pain have participated in the study. The patients have been divided into two groups with a high and low upper-limb performance by Action Reach Arm Test. The best cutoff point between groups, sensitivity, and specificity by Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) for Ad-AHA has been calculated. 
Results:  Significant differentiation in the total score of Ad-AHA between high and low upper-limb performance groups have been seen (P˂0.001). The best cutoff point for the total score of Ad-AHA between stroke patients with high and low performance in the upper-limb who had pain was 47 (sensitivity=95.45, specificity=89.21).
Conclusion: The results of this study have shown that the Ad-AHA has high sensitivity and specificity to discriminate between stroke patient with high and low performance in upper-limb performance who had pain. 

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