Document Type : Original Articles

Authors

1 Department of Physiotherapy, Osun State University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria.

2 Department of Physiotherapy, Osun State University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria

3 Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

10.30476/jrsr.2021.91566.1176

Abstract

Background: This study was aimed to explore whether handgrip and quadriceps strength predict Post-Stroke Depression (PSD) and Post-Stroke Anxiety (PSA).
Methods: Sixty-six consenting stroke survivors participated in this cross-sectional study. PSD and PSA were assessed using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) while the affected handgrip and quadriceps strength were measured using handheld dynamometers. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Alpha level was set at p < 0.05.
Results: The mean handgrip and quadriceps strength of the participants were 19.03kg and 20.70 kg. The prevalence of PSD and PSA were 33.4% and 42.4%. PSD was significantly correlated with each of PSA (r = 0.61; p < 0.001), handgrip strength (r = -0.24; p = 0.049), functional independence (r = -0.26; p = 0.036), and stroke severity(r = 0.26; p = 0.039); while PSA was significantly correlated with stroke severity (r = 0.25; p = 0.046) and age (r = - 0.25; p = 0.048). Multiple linear regression results indicate that handgrip and quadriceps strength were not independent predictors of PSD and PSA (p>0.05), however, presence of PSA was an independent predictor of PSD (B = 0.590; p < 0.001) while presence of PSD (B = 0.621; p = 0.001) and younger age (B = -0.307; p < 0.001) were independent predictors of PSA.
Conclusion: Handgrip and quadriceps strength are not significant predictors of PSD and PSA in stroke survivors. However, PSD and PSA can predict each other, indicating a bi-directional relationship, while age was a negative predictor of PSA.

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